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How To Be Great like Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and others?

Dele Omotosho
Dele Omotosho
3 min read

Here’s the untold secret

I found this remarkable and want to share.

Donald Trump was once asked how he became a billionaire.

Most expected an answer long and sour, but Trump kept it short and sweet: “EVERYTHING in life is LUCK.”

And here's the truth about "greatness"


A Word from Fellow Animals

The lab rat is dumped into the “greatness” maze at birth.

From the rat’s perspective, he knows not whether a mad scientist or a tree or a breeze was responsible for the grand appearance. …

This rat born in the greatness maze appears free to roam as he pleases . . . go here, go there. The rat even makes plans to freely will into existence his great plans!

Here’s the catch: the rodent is strictly forbidden from ever leaving the confines of the maze!

Given that the maze has a distinct design, That is, paths interconnected so as to influence the rodent’s behavior—the rat dies without ever having escaped the maze.

Such is the true nature of the greatness maze!



The Truth about the Greatness of Bill Gates, Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and co. .


Bill Gates was born into a family of prominence!

His father was one of the best lawyers in the nation; his grandfather was J.W. Maxwell—the president of a national bank.

And so, in the late 60s, while the rest of the world had never even heard of the word “computer,” aside from its original meaning—someone who computes—the same can’t be said for the privileged Gates.

Why?

His wealthy parents enrolled him in the exclusive private school Lakeside. And it was at this school where wealthy members of the Mothers’ Club pooled together money to buy a block of computer time for Gates.

Even Gates couldn’t help but admit:


For us today to truly appreciate how rare computer access was in the late 60s, imagine if a handful of people today already had access to self-driving cars. …

Conversely, what if Gates had been born to parents who lived in a rough & tough ghetto on Chicago’s Southside?

Would Bill Gates have become the “great” computer whiz we know him as today?

Or would he simply have become “Bill from the hood?”

What about Jeff Bezos?

Bezos grew up in the extremely wealthy River Oaks neighborhood, a few blocks away from the estate of former president George H. W. Bush.

For the above reason, Bezos—armed with an Ivy League education—thought nothing of it when his parents loaned him $250,000 to ensure his fledgling Amazon business stayed afloat.

Imagine:

Jeff Bezos had been the child of poor farmer in rural Alabama?

Would he still have had those “loaded” parents to help him get Amazon up and running?

Elon Musk’s mother was a famous model.

As for teaMusk’s father?

He was an electromechanical engineer . . . a sailor . . . a pilot . . . a true Renaissance Man!

And so, when Elon said:


I couldn’t help but think: “Elon, I’m sure you could count on more than one hand how many times Lady Luck has smiled favorably upon ya!”

Steve Jobs’ life has been well-documented and hence you don’t need me to recount his tale of “fortunate” breaks.

From the other Steve (Wozniak)—the true “brains” behind designing the Apple products, to having “coincidently” grown up in what would become Silicon Valley, it all just seemed to perfectly “fall in place” for ol’ Steve!

Even Jobs had to admit:


As for Richard Branson, another son of a prominent lawyer and—get this—grandson of an extremely influential judge. ...

And so, unsurprisingly Branson in all sincerity admitted:


I’ll close this section by honoring Branson’s grandfather, Your Honor Judge George Branson:


Summing things up


The Delphic Oracle crowned Socrates the “wisest man in Athens.”

Socrates in turn justified the title by noting:


To “control” something is to exert influence over it. But, ponder this:

We’re all flung onto the world’s stage and never get to choose either our birthday or death-day.

Think about it. …

And so, given the state of affairs: at which point does any mortal—caught swinging on the pendulum between the two extremes, birth and death—ever get to exert influence over events?

According to biology, each fertilized egg—upon conception—contains all the genetic information that results in our height, race, gender and so forth.

Clearly, then, the genotype lies outside each of our capacities to exert influence over it.

Clearly everything from the genotype to the phenotype lies beyond mortal control. …

For the above reason, when the press attempted to shower Einstein with the title “genius,” he abruptly set them straight:


In short, as Abraham Lincoln once noted: “You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool ALL the people ALL the time.”

This notion that these billionaires became “great” because they’re somehow “special” . . . I’m not buying it with their money!

And neither is science nor is religion buying it!

And neither should you, my fellow reader …

Growth

Dele Omotosho

I help software businesses in emerging markets breakthrough sustainably & profitably


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